Watchwords

Just an AACTA!

THE 2018 AACTA AWARDS: PRESENTERS REBECCA GIBNEY and ERIK THOMSON presented an award instead of getting one for a change. Rebecca was born in New Zealand, but since she’s such a good actress, of course we claim her. The role of Dr Jane Halifax in ‘Halifax f.p.’ was created especially for her and it enjoyed huge success, with a further 20 telemovies made until 2002. From August 2008 until it ended in 2013, Rebecca played the female lead of Julie Rafter on the 7 Network’s ‘Packed to the Rafters’ opposite Erik Thomson and won the Gold Logie in 2009 for her performance. Multi-award-winning actor ERIK THOMSON was born in Inverness, Scotland, but his family emigrated to New Zealand when he was seven. In 1995 he saw the light and moved to Australia where he played Dr Mitch Stevens in ‘All Saints’, and later took on the role of Dave Rafter in ‘Packed to the Rafters’ opposite Rebecca Gibney. From 2015 to 2018 he played the lead role in ‘800 Words’. Not bad for a Scottish New Zealander. Should we claim him? Of course we should. (Photo by L.J. May S/S)

Watchwords

On these pages you will find competitions and other opportunities for authors, performance writers for stage and screen, illustrators and filmmakers. See entries below the quick list for more detailed information.  

In this section we list competitions open to writers of prose and poetry. Detailed information is listed below. Entries are in date order and those with deadlines looming are highlighted in red.  

  • Applications for the 2019 BLACK&WRITE! WRITING FELLOWSHIPS are now open! The Writing Fellowships Program offers a $10,000 cash prize to two Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander writers for their unpublished manuscripts. Recipients of the black&write! Fellowships work with the black&write! editors to develop their manuscripts towards publication.Applications close at 5.00 p.m. on Thursday 31 January 2019.
  • Fantastica invites Australian and New Zealand writers to submit science fiction manuscripts for consideration in the THE FANTASTICA PRIZE. Entrants must normally be residents of Australia or New Zealand. Entries close at Midnight on Thursday, 31 January 2019 (EST).
  • Spineless Wonders are delighted to call for submissions to the 2019 CARMEL BIRD DIGITAL LITERARY AWARD. Now in its second year, the award is for short fiction collections up to 30,000 words in length. Submissions close on Sunday, 3 February 2019.
  • Entries for THE NEWCASTLE SHORT STORY AWARD are now open. You don’t have to be a member of Hunter Writers Centre to enter the competition. You do have to be an Australian citizen or permanent resident over 18 years, but you can be residing anywhere in the world. Entries close at 8.00 p.m. on Monday, 4 February 2019.

For THEATRE/FILM/TV etc. Click here: THEATRE, FILM & TV

 

Who: State Library of Queensland (SLQ)

What: 2019 BLACK&WRITE! WRITING FELLOWSHIPS

Entries close: 5.00 p.m. on Thursday 31 January 2019.

Contact: For guidelines and the application form visit the website at http://www.slq.qld.gov.au/whats-on/awards/blackwrite. For further information and enquiries, contact black&write! by email at indigenous.writing@slq.qld.gov.au or phone (07) 3842 9985

Cost: NIL to enter.

What’s happening: The Rules. Applications for the 2019 BLACK&WRITE! WRITING FELLOWSHIPS are now open!  Black&Write! is a national project and the first of its kind in Australia. The project is designed to recruit, train, and mentor Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander editors to develop Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-authored manuscripts. Black&write! is a State Library of Queensland project. Black&write! is made up of the black&write! Writing Fellowships and the black&write! Editing Internships.

Black&write! aims to train, mentor, and promote outstanding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander writers and editors, encourage lifelong Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander learning and literacy and foster a love of reading, writing, and ideas in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Black&write! is assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council, its arts funding and advisory body.

The Prize: The Writing Fellowships Program offers a $10,000 cash prize to two Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander writers for their unpublished manuscripts. Recipients of the black&write! Fellowships work with the black&write! editors to develop their manuscripts towards publication. At the end of each Fellowship, the edited manuscripts have the opportunity to be published by black&write! publishing partner Hachette Australia.

Through the Editing Internships Program, black&write! employ and train Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander editors, providing support, mentorship and practical development with Australian publishers. During the internship, editors have the opportunity to participate in real industry processes and see a manuscript through to the stage of being ready for publication.

 

Who: Brio Books – Fantastica.

What: THE FANTASTICA PRIZE

Entries close: Midnight on Thursday, 31 January 2019 (EST)

Contact: For guidelines and the application form visit the website at https://briobooks.com.au/blog/2018/5/8/fantastica-sf-prize, Enter here https://xoum.submittable.com/submit/6dfdd1ae-711b-4f5f-bbaf-c8fc8e6836b7/the-fantastica-sf-prize. For further information, please contact info@briobooks.com.au. Shortlist Announcement: April 2019; Winner Announcement: May-Dec 2019; Release: March 2020.

Cost: NIL to enter.

What’s happening: The Rules. Fantastica invites Australian and New Zealand writers to submit science fiction manuscripts for consideration in the THE FANTASTICA PRIZE. Entrants must normally be residents of Australia or New Zealand. The manuscript must be an original work, written entirely by the entrant and it must be written in English. No more than 10 per cent of the manuscript can have been previously published in print form, or in electronic form, on a commercial basis.

What are they after? Manuscripts of 30,000 words or more. Works that start with a bang, blow their minds and subvert our expectations. Science fiction, not fantasy. Anything high-tech, low-tech or even no-tech (if you are OK with post-apoc style sci fi?). Stories set on a generation ship, on a futuristic terra firma or on a planet a million light years away.

The Prize: $2000 + print and digital publication through Fantastica. Winners will have their manuscript carefully shepherded to publication by an editor and the Fantastica team. The winning novel will be professionally designed with our usual flair and unleashed in digital and printed form in bookshops, on our website and eBook retailers.

 

Who: Spineless Wonders Short Australian Stories.

What: CARMEL BIRD DIGITAL LITERARY AWARD

Submissions close: Sunday, 3 February 2019.

Contact: For guidelines and the application form visit the website at https://shortaustralianstories.com.au/submissions/the-carmel-bird-award/the-carmel-bird-digital-literary-award. General submissions, click here. Concession submissions, click here. For enquiries, email info [at] http://www.shortaustralianstories.com.au

Spineless Wonders wishes to thank the Copyright Agency’s Cultural Fund for its support of this project. The winner and runners-up will be announced in October, 2019.

Cost: Entry fee is $25. Concession holders and full-time students may enter for $20 via a Concession entry form.

What’s happening: The Rules. Spineless Wonders are delighted to call for submissions to the 2019 CARMEL BIRD DIGITAL LITERARY AWARD. Now in its second year, the award is for short fiction collections up to 30,000 words in length. Spineless Wonders is not a children’s publisher but a publisher for adult readers. As a guide, you can check out what Spineless Wonders has already published.

To enter you must be over 18, reside in Australia, or be an Australian living overseas. Submissions may be written in any fiction genre and all prose forms are acceptable, including non-fiction prose. You could, for example, include short stories and reflective essays. For examples, see My Hearts Are Your Hearts by Carmel Bird, My Life & Other Fictions by Michael Giacometti and the anthology, Cracking The Spine: Ten short Australian stories and how they were written, ed. by Julie Chevalier and Bronwyn Mehan.

The judge for the 2019 Carmel Bird Digital Literary Award is MOYA COSTELLO. Moya Costello‘s four books are short fiction (‘Kites in Jakarta’ and ‘Small Ecstasies’) and short novels (The Office as a Boat and Harriet Chandler). She has been awarded arts grants and fellowships; has writing in many journals and anthologies, four from Spineless Wonders; a PhD in Creative Writing; and is an adjunct lecturer, Southern Cross University.

‘I come from a feminist, experimental tradition, and recognise in Bird a writer who takes risks in her practice. Spineless Wonders is one of the best things happening in contemporary Australian publishing. They publish or produce in multiple formats: print, audio, video, film and live performance. I am very pleased to be able to contribute to publishing the best of short forms in digital media with Spineless Wonders, and potentially to contribute to Spineless Wonders’ significant development of award-wining authors.’ MOYA COSTELLO

The Prize: The award includes cash prize amounts of $3,000 for the winner and $1,000 for two runners-up as well as world-wide digital publication of all three winning entries as part of the  Capsule Collections series. The three finalists will be published in digital form as part of the prize for the award. Any print publication will be subject to further discussion with the publisher

 

Who: Hunter Writers Centre.

What: NEWCASTLE SHORT STORY AWARD 2019

Entries close: 8.00 p.m. Monday, 4 February 2019.

Contact: For guidelines and the application form visit the website at https://hunterwriterscentre.org/newcastle-short-story-award-2019 and https://hunterwriterscentre.org/product/newcastle-short-story-award-2019.

Entry is online only. Attach your story as a .pdf or Word document (.doc) file via the entry form. You may also want to check out their Frequently Asked Questions.

Cost: $16.50. Entrants are welcome to submit more than one story. There is no limit on number of entries. A separate entry form, and separate entry fee of $16.50 (incl. GST) must accompany each entry. The prize winners will be announced at the anthology launch on Friday, 5 April 2019.

What’s happening: The Rules. Judges Annabel Smith and Tim Richards are waiting with nostrils aquiver for your stories entered into THE NEWCASTLE SHORT STORY AWARD 2019. You do not have to be a member of Hunter Writers Centre to enter the competition.

The word limit is 2,000. This includes titles and any sub-headings. There is no minimum. Your story must not include your name or any identifying marks. This means any word that the judges can link directly to you. Be sure there are no words in your story that identify you as the author.

Entrants must be aged over 18 years. Entries must be the original work of the applicant and must not be published in any form or currently offered for publication. The Hunter Writers Centre adopts the Aboriginal Arts and Cultural Protocols and the NSW Aboriginal Arts and Cultural Strategy. If your work references Indigenous lives, voices, culture, country you must read that document.

The Prize: Over $5,000 in prizes. 30 selected works will be published in the 2019 anthology.

 

COMPETITIONS P.3

THEATRE, FILM & TV

COMPETITIONS ETC.

WATCHWORDS HOME  

THE 2018 AACTA AWARDS: The 2018 AACTA AWARD FOR BEST LEAD ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION DRAMA was won by KATE BOX for ‘Riot’. At top: Actress Kate graduated from NIDA with a degree in performing arts in 2003, and became known for her excellent performances in ‘The Black Balloon’ (2008), ‘The Diplomat’ (2009), and ‘A Funny Kind of Love’ (2014), as well as having a strong theatre presence. Kate has also worked on shows including ‘Rake’, ‘Offspring’ and ‘Picnic at Hanging Rock’ and in the feature films ‘Three Summers’ and ‘The Little Death’. For her performance in ‘Riot’ she has also been nominated for a Logie for most Outstanding Actress as well as winning the AACTA award. ‘Riot’, the ABC’s feature-length telemovie in which Kate plays activist Marg McMann, is based on real people and events. In the early 1970s, when the Australian Gay and Lesbian Rights Movement was just getting started, people began standing up to discrimination against gay people and outright police brutality, but in 1978 the fight for gay rights reached a crisis point. This is the story of the movement as well as Marg’s. At bottom: The courage and resilience of the 78’ers to bring about the changes which eventually resulted in marriage equality is celebrated every year with a bus in the Mardi Gras parade. Up the 78’ers! (Photos by L.J. May S/S)