Watchwords

EMILY BRONTË’S 200TH BIRTHDAY.

EMILY BRONTË’S 200TH BIRTHDAY. After the death of their sisters, Maria and Elizabeth, the three remaining Brontë sisters and brother Branwell were educated at home by their father and their mother’s sister Elizabeth Branwell. In their leisure time they began to write fiction, inspired by a box of toy soldiers Branwell had received as a gift. They created a number of fantasy worlds, one of which was Branwell's The Life of Alexander Percy, a story in which Percy and his wife have such a complete love and understanding for one another that eventually their love becomes self-destructive. Her brother's story was to become Emily’s inspiration for Wuthering Heights. (Drawing of the Duke of Zamora, thought to be a likeness based on Branwell Bronte. PD)

Watchwords

This page is devoted to events and activities of interest to writers, illustrators and readers! Go to entries below the quick list for more detailed information.   

  • JANE MILBURN – sustainability consultant and founder of TEXTILE BEAT – arrived at the slow clothing philosophy by refashioning garments in her wardrobe to provide meaning and story. Join Jane as she discusses her journey to slow clothing and shares ideas you can easily implement, at the Indooroopilly Library on Sunday, 22 July, Bracken Ridge Library on Saturday, a.m. 28 July, and the West End Library on Saturday, p.m. 28 July 2018.
  • Join bestselling author SALLY PIPER, author of Grace’s Table, to discuss her gripping new novel, The Geography of Friendshipan ode to walking and nature as well as a template for how memory and place intersect, at Riverbend Books, Bulimba, on Monday, 23 July at 6.30 p.m.
  • Come along to hear prolific author of Australian historical fiction ALLI SINCLAIR speak about her latest novel Burning Fields, which has been described as 'Romeo and Juliet set in Queensland's sugar cane fields in 1948’, at Riverbend Books, Bulimba, on Thursday, 26 July 2018 at 6.30 p.m.
  • Join author JODIE LANE as she discusses the historical research behind her novel To Kill an Emperor, which examines the extent to which time traveller Gwyn must go to make history turn true. Time slip your way into the Kenmore Library on Friday, 27 July 2018.
  • Dress up in your best Harry Potter character costume, grab a wand and come on down for an evening of fun and magic at HARRY POTTER NIGHT!involving prizes, games and spells galore! ‘We Solemnly Swear We Are Up To No Good… at Riverbend Books, Bulimba, on Friday, 27 July 2018 at 6.00 p.m.
  • The Walkley Foundation's journalism festival, STORYOLOGY, takes you behind the true stories that shape our world. This year, panels featuring some of Australia's best journalists will delve into the headlines to figure out what great journalism looks like, and how it impacts our everyday lives in an increasingly uncertain world. Head for the Palace Barracks Cinema, 61 Petrie Terrace, Brisbane on Friday, 27 July and Saturday, 28 July 2018.

 

The Event: MEET JANE MILBURN TO DISCUSS SLOW CLOTHING

Date, time and BCC library venues for ‘Meet Jane Milburn’: Sunday, 22 July 2018 from 12.30 p.m. to 1.30 p.m. at Indooroopilly Library (Phone: (07) 3407 0009); Saturday, 28 July 2018 from 10.00 a.m. to 11.00 a.m. at Bracken Ridge Library (Phone: (07) 3667 6060); Saturday, 28 July 2018 from 2.00 p.m. to 3.00 p.m. at West End Library (Phone: (07) 3403 8620).

Ticket price: FREE but bookings are required at the presenting library by contacting them on the phone numbers given above.

What’s happening: What’s happening: Slow Clothing: Finding meaning in what we wear presents a compelling case for why we need to change the way we dress – to live lightly on Earth through the everyday practice of how we wear and care for our clothes. In an era dominated by passive consumption of cheap and synthetic fashion, JANE MILBURN – sustainability consultant and founder of TEXTILE BEAT – arrived at the slow clothing philosophy by refashioning garments in her wardrobe to provide meaning and story.

According to Jane, slow clothing reflects our own style and spirit, independent of fashion cycles, and supports us to buy thoughtfully and be original, authentic and resourceful. Join Jane as she discusses her journey to slow clothing and shares ideas you can easily implement. Books will be available for purchase on the day, or bring your copy from home for Jane to sign.

 

The Event: MEET AUTHOR SALLY PIPER

Date and time: Monday, 23 July 2018 at 6.30 p.m.

Venue: Riverbend Books, 193 Oxford St, Bulimba Queensland 4171.

Ticket price: $8.00. Phone: (07) 3899 8555, email info@riverbendbooks.com.au or go online at http://riverbendbooks.com.au and click on Events to book your place(s). PLEASE NOTE: Riverbend does not issue paper tickets for events. Your name will be on a list at the door.

What’s happening: What’s happening: SALLY PIPER’s debut novel, Grace’s Table, was a bestseller and was shortlisted for the Queensland Premier’s Literary Awards. Sally drew inspiration for her second novel from her love of bushwalking as well as her interest in how women are conditioned to be cautious, to avoid trouble and to limit themselves due to real or perceived threats.

‘The Geography of Friendship is an ode to walking and nature as well as a template for how memory and place intersect. But it is also a memorandum of the power of female friendship and the importance of unity,’ says Piper. ‘In a world where women are taught to be afraid, it’s empowering to realise the strength we hold together.’

Meet Sally to discuss The Geography of Friendship, in which three young women set off on a hike in the wilderness anticipating the adventure of a lifetime. Over the next five days, as they face up to the challenging terrain, it soon becomes clear that they are not alone, and the freedom they feel quickly turns to fear. Only when it is too late for them to turn back do they fully appreciate the danger they are in.

Their friendship is tested and each makes an irrevocable choice, the legacy of which haunts them for years to come. Two decades later and now in their forties, Samantha, Lisa and Nicole are estranged, but decide to revisit their original hike in an attempt to salvage what they lost. They are forced to come to terms with the differences that have grown between them and the true value of friendship. 

 

The Event: MEET AUTHOR ALLI SINCLAIR

Date and time: Thursday, 26 July 2018 at 6.30 p.m.

Venue: Riverbend Books, 193 Oxford St, Bulimba Queensland 4171.

Ticket price: $8.00. Phone: (07) 3899 8555, email info@riverbendbooks.com.au or go online at http://riverbendbooks.com.au and click on Events to book your place(s). PLEASE NOTE: Riverbend does not issue paper tickets for events. Your name will be on a list at the door.

What’s happening: Author ALLI SINCLAIR is a prolific author of Australian historical fiction. Come along to hear her speak about her latest novel Burning Fields, which has been described as 'Romeo and Juliet set in Queensland's sugar cane fields in 1948, as the daughter of an Anglo-Australian family falls for an Italian immigrant against the wishes of her family.'  

1948: The world is struggling to regain a sense of balance after the devastation of World War II, and the sugar cane-growing community of Piri River in northern Queensland is no exception. As returned servicemen endeavour to adjust to their pre-war lives, women who had worked for the war effort are expected to embrace traditional roles once more. 

Rosie Stanton finds it difficult to return to the family farm after years working for the Australian Women's Army Service. Reminders are everywhere of the brothers she lost in the war and she is unable to understand her father's contempt for Italians, especially the Conti family next door.

When her father takes ill, Rosie challenges tradition by managing the farm, but outside influences are determined to see her fail. Desperate to leave his turbulent history behind, Tomas Conti has left Italy to join his family in Piri River. Tomas struggles to adapt in Australia – until he meets Rosie. Her easy-going nature and positive outlook help him forget the life he's escaped.

As their relationship grows, so do tensions between the two families until the situation becomes explosive. When a long-hidden family secret is discovered and Tomas's mysterious past is revealed, everything Rosie believes is shattered. Will she risk all to rebuild her family or will she lose the only man she's ever loved?

 

The Event: MEET AUTHOR JODIE LANE

Date and time: Friday, 27 July 2018 from 10.00 a.m. to 11.00 a.m.

Venue: Kenmore Library.

Ticket price: FREE to attend, but bookings are essential. Ring the Kenmore Library on (07) 3407 0258 to reserve your place(s).

What’s happening: Join author JODIE LANE as she discusses the historical research behind her novel To Kill an Emperor. Once again, Gwyn must save history and to do so she must kill a man – but not just any man. Emperor Domitian of the Roman Empire is a feared tyrant and paranoid about plots and assassins. Can Gwyn find the plotters and help them succeed? Or will she find herself betrayed?

With new friends and old, Gwyn negotiates the intricacies of Ancient Roman politics and society. A rich tale based on real events, To Kill an Emperor examines the extent to which a time traveller must go to make history turn true. Books will be available for purchase on the day, or bring your copy from home for Jodie to sign.

 

The Event: FOR KIDS AND CARERS – IT’S HARRY POTTER NIGHT!

Date and time: Friday, 27 July 2018 at 6.00 p.m.

Venue: Riverbend Books, 193 Oxford St, Bulimba Queensland 4171.

Ticket price: $5.00. Phone: (07) 3899 8555, email info@riverbendbooks.com.au or go online at http://riverbendbooks.com.au and click on Events to book your place(s). PLEASE NOTE: Riverbend does not issue paper tickets for events. Your name will be on a list at the door.

What’s happening: Twenty-one years ago, Suzy Wilson purchased a house on Oxford street that would, in one year, become a home for books. At the same time, on the other side of the world, J.K. Rowling released HARRY POTTER AND THE PHILOSOPHER'S STONE. It's safe to say that RIVERBEND BOOKS has grown up alongside Harry, and Riverbend think that it’s only fitting to bring a little Hogwarts magic to their birthday celebrations!

You may remember PROFESSOR FRANKIE FALCONETTE from their previous Harry Potter Party. Well, she's bringing her show back to Riverbend at 6.00 p.m. on Friday 27th July! Dress up in your best Harry Potter character costume, grab a wand and come on down for an evening of fun and magic – with prizes, games and spells galore! That means you too, adults and carers – you know you want to! ‘We Solemnly Swear We Are Up To No Good…

 

The Event: STORYOLOGY BRISBANE 2018

Date and time: Friday, 27 July and Saturday, 28 July 2018.

Venue: The Palace Barracks Cinema, 61 Petrie Terrace, Brisbane.  

Ticket price: Tickets are on sale now. Brisbane tickets: FRIDAY NIGHT – Storyology opening night $35 (talk only) – no discounts. SATURDAY – Storyology Saturday Pass $95 (10.30 a.m. to 4.00 p.m., 4 sessions) – 40% discount for MEAA members. Individual sessions cost $30 each. Individual sessions (students and pensioners) are $20. Go to the website to get your tickets and explore the program at http://www.walkleys.com/storyology-program-2018.

What’s happening: STORYOLOGY is the Walkley Foundation's journalism festival, which takes you behind the true stories that shape our world. This year, panels featuring some of Australia's best journalists will delve into the headlines to figure out what great journalism looks like, how it’s made, and how it impacts our everyday lives in an increasingly uncertain world. The festival is part of the Walkley Foundation’s growing program of public talks and exhibitions that showcase great journalism.

On Friday night, 27 July 2018 from 6.00 p.m. to 7.30 p.m. a panel will tackle ‘THIS BOOK CHANGED MY LIFE’. What is the one book that you press into the hands of new acquaintances? The book that you feel will open their eyes to a truth about the world, or explain you to them in a succinct few hundred pages? Non-fiction and fiction alike are under consideration as the storytellers talk about the single book that most influenced their lives.

Panellists for the Friday night talk will be: TRENT DALTON, journalist, The Weekend Australian magazine, and author; PETER GRESTE, journalist and University of Queensland professor; MELISSA UCASHENKO, writer; and Moderator ADAM SUCKLING, CEO, Copyright Agency. Go to the website to learn more about the speakers and explore the Saturday program at http://www.walkleys.com/storyology-program-2018.

 

WHAT'S ON AUTHORS P4

WHAT'S ON AUTHORS P2

WHAT'S ON AUTHORS?

WATCHWORDS HOME

EMILY BRONTË’S 200TH BIRTHDAY. When she was seventeen, Emily Brontë attended the Roe Head Girls' School, where Charlotte was a teacher, but was overcome by extreme homesickness within a few months. Charlotte later said that: ‘Liberty was the breath of Emily's nostrils; without it she perished. The change from her own home to a school and from her own very noiseless, very secluded but unrestricted and unartificial mode of life, to one of disciplined routine (though under the kindest auspices), was what she failed in enduring... I felt in my heart she would die, if she did not go home, and with this conviction obtained her recall.’ Emily returned home and Anne took her place. The girls were determined to gain sufficient education to open a small school of their own. Hoping to perfect their French and German, in 1842 Emily and Charlotte travelled to the Héger Pensionnat in Brussels, Belgium, and attended the girls’ academy run by Contantin Héger. Emily felt uncomfortable and refused to adopt Belgian fashions, saying ‘I wish to be as God made me’, which made her somewhat of an outcast. Héger, however, was impressed with Emily’s strength of character and made the following observation: ‘She should have been a man – a great navigator. Her powerful reason would have deduced new spheres of discovery from the knowledge of the old; and her strong imperious will would never have been daunted by opposition or difficulty, never have given way but with life. She had a head for logic, and a capability of argument unusual in a man and rarer indeed in a woman... impairing this gift was her stubborn tenacity of will which rendered her obtuse to all reasoning where her own wishes, or her own sense of right, was concerned.’ (Photo of the signpost for Brontë Way in Yorkshire, a destination for thousands of Brontë fans every year, by L.J. May)